Review

Murder Most Fair

book cover

Publisher: Kensington
Date: 31st August 2021
Source:Publisher via NetGalley

November 1919. A relaxing few weeks by the seaside with her husband, Sidney, could almost convince Verity Kent that life has returned to the pleasant rhythm of pre-war days. Then Verity’s beloved Great-Aunt Ilse lands on their doorstep. After years in war-ravaged Germany, Ilse has returned to England to repair her fragile health–and to escape trouble. Someone has been sending her anonymous threats, and Verity’s Secret Service contacts can only provide unsettling answers.

Even deep in the Yorkshire Dales, where she joins Verity’s family for the holidays, Ilse encounters difficulties. Normally peaceful neighbors are hostile, seeking someone to blame for the losses they’ve endured. When Ilse’s maid is found dead, Verity must uncover whether this is anti-German sentiment taken to murderous lengths, or whether there is a more personal motive at work. Could Verity’s shadowy nemesis, Lord Ardmore, be involved? And if so, how much closer to home will the blow land when he inevitably strikes again?

Murder Most Fair was another very good addition to the Verity Kent mysteries by Anna Lee Huber. I really enjoyed this one for a number of reasons.

Verity and Sidney finally return to Verity’s family home up in Yorkshire. We have been waiting like her family for this return. However Verity has been dealing with war things, plus she has found it hard to face into the fact her brother Rob will no longer be there. He was shot down during the war in his fighter plane.  

During the whole book we see Verity struggling with re inserting herself into the family, and we get a view of the various family members. Her mother, a rather difficult and fraught relationship, her Dad seems steady, her two brothers with post war related stresses and her sister Grace. Grace is young and has missed her sister. But…

I loved where she lived. Very English – not of Downton Abbey standing but in a much smaller way, still very class oriented. They had a butler and maids, Verity’s mother was sort of the “the” lady of the village.

The fact they have Aunt Ilse with them and her German maid provides some tension as the villagers are not happy to have Germans among them. And so the mystery evolves and comes to its frightful conclusion. I did sort of suspect but didn’t get it totally right. 

All the time the over arcing story of what Lord Ardmore is doing and when he might strike next is always threading its way through the story, which muddies the waters of the present mystery as well.

Truthfully Verity and Sidney and now her family have wormed their way into my heart. I can’t wait to see what happens next.