Review

Home Fires. Fiona Lowe

Book cover

Published: Harlequin Australia
Date: 18th February 2019
Genre: Women’s fiction

Banner

I am still dabbing my eyes and swallowing the back taste of smoke as I finish Home Fires by Fiona Lowe. As I read into the book I just couldn’t put it down,  I was drawn into the lives of the people of Myrtle in Victoria, Australia.

We all watch devastating events happening most nights as they play out on our TV screens. As I read this book I am hearing about a fire devastate a town in my own country.  Home Fires explores the terrible destruction of fire that can spring up and engulf a community.

This is a book not only about the horror of fire out of control, but the lives of people both before and after the fire. There is the shock of loss of life and home and animals. Add into that the people who survive and the huge stress that is placed on them. The world forgets them, but they are left to pick up the pieces.

Home Fires presents us with a wonderful group of characters all who are dealing with fire related issues, and issues that were already present and greatly exacerbated by the fire. We see a motley group of people struggle and fall, challenge each other and support each other until… something new arises.

So worth reading! A fabulous Australian setting,a disaster event and the courageous response to it, family upheaval, violence and marriage issues, PTSD, crime, and above all family and community supporting each other. This book has it all. The title of the book is totally apt and the cover gorgeous.

Goodreads icon

13 thoughts on “Home Fires. Fiona Lowe”

  1. This sounds really interesting. I can’t say I’ve ever read a book about the aftermath of a destructive fire (although I’ve read two books about people being burned; The Burn Journals by Brent Runyon and Burn Unit by Barbara Ravage), so this is one I’ll keep an eye out for.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I can see why this was such an emotional novel. My parents’ business burned down about thirty years ago. Thankfully they were able to rebuild but the emotional trauma of the event was far-lasting. Thanks for telling us about this book, Kathryn.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.